The White-necked Swan is a species of bird anseriforme’s own family. The two sexes are alike in appearance, except that males are generally larger than females.

 

 

Species

C. olor

Order

Anseriformes

Family

Anatidae

Danger of Extinction

Bajo riesgo (Preocupación menor)

Features

Features:

The two sexes are alike in appearance, except that males are generally larger than females. They are best distinguished from North American swans by the knob at the base of the upper bill, and the colour of the bill itself, which is orange, with the tip and base coloured in black. This is the second largest waterfowl species after the trumpeter swan.

Customs, food and habitat:

Customs, food and habitat:

Breeding begins in March or early April. Mute swans lay an average of four eggs that the female broods for 36-38 days. The cygnets do not reach the ability to flight before they are 120 to 150 days.

Their geographical distribution is British Isles, north central Europe and Asia.

The chicks are brownish gray (gradually turning white within the next 12 months) and only remain in the nest for one day.

 

They feed on algae and aquatic plants, invertebrates and insects also.

Curiosities

Curiosities:

This is the second largest waterfowl species after the trumpeter swan. When swimming, a mute swan holds its neck in a graceful curve with the bill pointing downward, as opposed to other swans, they carry their bills level and necks erect.